Sword and the Script

7 Takeaways from Mindful Social Media Marketing [Book Review]



by Frank Strong

7 Takeaways from Mindful Social Media Marketing

The concept of Mindfulness has attracted the attention of some of the most recognizable corporate brands, such as Google, Target and General Mills, according to the Harvard Business Review.

In some ways, mindfulness is the antithesis of multitasking, though the concept is deeper:

“When was the last time you sat quietly at your desk and did nothing but think? How would you react if you observed a peer, employee, or manager doing so? Encouraging employees to slow down to focus on the present can seem at odds with a corporate culture of speed and goal attainment. But in today’s hyper-paced work environment, mindfulness practitioners know the importance of recharging in order to regain productivity. And mindfulness research is convincing many managers that investing in reflection, openness, and thoughtfulness will have a positive impact on employees and on the bottom line.”

It’s fitting then, and perhaps quite timely, social and otherwise, that mindfulness is extending itself to social media marketing. Read More…

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Survey says PR Best Positioned to Manage Corporate Social Media



by Frank Strong

PR in a Better Position to Manage Corporate Social Media

Ownership is a strong word in the high-stakes game of corporate social media turf wars – yet consensus increasingly points to PR as primary proponents.

A recent survey by the employment agency, The Creative Group, says corporate executives are increasingly inclined to pin the communications shop with such responsibility. More than half, or 51% of executive surveyed said the public relations or communications department is “is best suited to oversee an organization’s social media efforts.”  Read More…

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Twitter: Social Ads at Volume are at Odds with Conversation



by Frank Strong

Mass Social Ads are at Odds with Conversation

“We’ve gone full circle,” according to Doug Baker writing for the UK-based Marketing.

“When brands first arrived on Facebook and organic reach was high, we spent a huge amount of time and effort on community engagement and interaction,” he wrote.

“However, as paid media options have grown, and organic reach has shrunk, we’re at risk of only viewing social as a way to pump out content as content.”

That neatly summarizes the challenges facing Twitter as it looks towards 2016.

The social medialites say Twitter has lost its former self, and devolved into a link sharing site that can’t possibly grow revenue to Wall Street’s satisfaction. Read More…

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Study: Marketing Budgets Take Aim at Digital, Social and Mobile



by Frank Strong

Study  Marketing Budgets Take Aim at Digital Social and Mobile

Marketers are more optimistic about the economy, expect marketing budgets to increase and will spend more on digital, social media and marketing analytics.

That’s according to a new survey of 288 senior marketing executives – the CMO Survey – conducted by Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business.  The survey was conducted in conjunction with the American Marketing Association and McKinsey & Co; Duke has run this survey twice a year since 2008.

Economy Smiles at Marketing

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5 Takeaways from the Salesforce State of Marketing



5 Takeaways from the Salesforce State of Marketing

Marketers disagree on needs and metrics – but appear to be doubling down on social media advertising and mobile marketing. That’s according to the new 2015 State of Marketing Report which Salesforce recently published.

The company that coined the term “marketing cloud” conducted the survey online in October and November 2015 and earned responses from 5,053 marketers around the globe. The report published in January 2015 is the second annual report – which provides benchmarks for understanding shifts in perception. Read More…

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The Marketing Value of Twitter Centers on Earned Media



The Marketing Value of Twitter Centers on Earned Media

Twitter made a number of advertising product (or inventory) announcements recently including a plan to sell ads on other websites. In a CMO round up, Wall Street Journal advertising reporter Steven Perlberg summed it up like this:

…Twitter has made the case that there is a large audience of people who see its content around the Web, but who aren’t actually registered to use the social media service. This is one of the arguments the company has played up to soothe the once-besotted investors worried about its growth prospects. But now, Twitter is readying plans to bring in dollars from those viewers: it wants to sell ads on the streams of tweets within other publishers’ apps and websites…

Certainly Twitter has a good case – there is undoubtedly a sizable audience that lurks on Twitter – and measuring the outcome of such visibility is challenging.  However the pursuit to “soothe the once-besotted investors” by showcasing what amounts to reach drowns out one of the things that makes Twitter so different from any other social ad option (especially Facebook):  It combines earned and paid. Read More…

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Dark Social Enlightens Marketing Vanity Metrics



Dark Social Enlightens Vanity Metrics

The blog posts weren’t especially compelling, in fact these were a little heavy with sales messages; case studies that had been re-purposed.

However instead of the classic problem-solution-format, they featured little vignettes showcasing minor customer victories. The posts were accented with liberal subheads, short paragraphs, and spotted with lots of bulleted lists – classic web writing if such a thing exists.

These were however, solid blog posts, but just not of the epic variety…or so we thought.  While the social share counts were quite low the web analytics were displaying sizable volume of traffic.  It caused us to ask – where was the interest coming from? Read More…

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13 Statistics from an Inc. 500 Social Media Study



by Frank Strong

social-media-study-Inc500
UMASS Dartmouth Center for Marketing Research is out with new research as part of its long standing study of business and its relationship with social media. The Center has been publishing research focused on either the Inc. 500 or the Fortune 500 since 2006.

I’m partial to the Center’s research because it includes some academic rigor – that is more or less absent an agenda. The current study focuses on the Inc. 500 and is a two-step methodology of reviewing use-cases and later conducting surveys by random sampling.

Key findings from the UMASS study Read More…

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Survey Says on Twitter, Small Business is Likeable



by Frank Strong
Survey Says on Twitter Small Business is Likeable

Conventional social media wisdom says people don’t like brands on Twitter – which in part explains the movement for humanization. Contrast that with “personal branding” and we indeed live in strange times where brands strive to be human, and people strive to be brands.  

Whether it’s the humanity or branding, there’s something inherently likeable about small business. Clearly there’s a lot to like – according to the Small Business Administration, small business makes up more than 99% of employer firms in the U.S. and provide for nearly half of all private sector jobs.  A new survey by Twitter – Small Business Customer Insights – says small business socially likable too. Read More…

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Infographic: Millennials and Social Commerce



by Frank Strong

social commerce

The Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is out with their latest social media report.  Though I’ve followed this series regularly, I haven’t read the full report yet, but spent some time perusing the highlights as presented in this infographic. I’m struck by the inverse relationship between some fans and followers on some social networks and the influence on purchasing.

For example, 62% of millennials follow brands on Facebook, but only 38% say they’ve made a purchase after liking a post.  Contrast that with just 11% of millennials on Pinterest, but 47% say they have made a purchase.  Is Pinterest comprised of early adopters more likely to make a purchase?  Does the visual nature of what some have called a “visual search engine” have a greater influence on purchase decisions?  Are people becoming immune to ads on Facebook? Read More…

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