Sword and the Script

We Should Measure Content Marketing by Relationships



by Frank Strong

3 Ideal Content Marketing Metrics

As a metric for content marketing, pageviews are flawed according to a white paper – Why Content Marketers Are Using All the Wrong Metrics – published by Contently.  The company provides the combination of a talent marketplace and content marketing software to manage projects and campaigns.

The white paper calls the pageview a “superficial impression of how people behave on the web.” It also labels the click “its evil queen.”

For 20 years, the media and marketing world has been beholden to the pageview, a deeply flawed metric that only captures the most superficial impression of how people behave on the web.

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5 Categories of PR Metrics Pros Should Measure



by Frank Strong

5 Categories of Measurement for PR Pros Should MeasureThere’s an old saying in advertising that half of the budget is wasted, but marketers don’t know which half. Today, there are enough analytical tools today to avoid wasting half of the marketing spend.

The demand for measuring effectiveness in marketing is on the rise too, according to an eMarketer report titled, Execs to Marketers: Show Me the Metrics.  The report combined data from two surveys issued by three different organizations.  Read More…

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The Folly of Public Relations Measurement



by Frank Strong

The Folly of Public Relations Measurement

Measuring public relations results is fast becoming my pet peeve. Not the act of actual public relations measurement, but the conversation around it.

It seems everyday now I read a new article penned by a well-intended PR expert that says counting clips is sophomoric and advocates an ambiguous need for PR need to “tie results to business outcomes.”

So what’s the peeve with that? It’s all fine, well and dandy except few pundits provide concrete examples of business outcomes. I’ve been to business school. I can discount cash flow, calculate IRR (or NPV if you’d prefer) and can argue at length the PR industry’s misuse of the term “ROI.” For the record, ROI is a financial term, where the benefit of an investment exceeds the cost of investment…quite literally it’s the “return” on the “investment.” ROI is empirical and measured in dollars and cents. My sense is, PR people use ROI interchangeably with the word, “benefit.” In other words, they’ve “repositioned” ROI.

But I digress: It’s one thing to bash clip counts or advertisement equivalencies (AVE), but if you are going to downplay one approach you need to provide examples of better approaches. Let me give you an example. Read More…

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