Sword and the Script

Content Marketing *is* PR



by Frank Strong

Content Marketing is PR

Some of the conclusions drawn from a recent study — The Role of Content in the Consumer Decision Making Process – are missing the mark from my perspective.  

One finding from the study:

A brand new in-lab study by Nielsen, commissioned by inPowered, shows that expert content—credible, third-party articles (earned media)—is the most effective source of information in impacting consumers along all stages of the purchase process across product categories. More specifically, when measured against owned media (branded content) it showed that earned media is 80 percent more effective at the bottom-of-the-funnel or purchase consideration stage, 80 percent more effective at the middle-of-the-funnel or affinity stage, and 38 percent more effective at the top-of-the-funnel or familiarity stage.

Based on that data, the conclusion is: PR is more effective than content marketing. Read More…

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9 Timeless PR Positioning Strategies



by Frank Strong

positioning strategies PR

The word “positioning” gets tossed around almost carelessly in corporate documents, and I often feel as if the word is misunderstood (that’s foreshadowing).  Positioning isn’t what we say, it’s what people think and to that end any “position” that is coveted by brands has to be plausible, or anything brands say will be misaligned.

Gartner positions vendors in its Magic Quadrant reports along four categories: Leaders, visionaries, challengers and niche players.  Positioning as a “leader” is generally a difficult proposition because every company claims to be a leaders.  If everyone is a leader, then leadership as point of differentiation has lost its luster. Read More…

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Influence Marketing puts Salespeople into Marketing Hats



by Frank Strong

Influence Marketing puts Salespeople into Marketing Hats

Tom Webster was shopping for a pair of shoes so he did what people do when they are looking for something: he turned to search.  And that’s when it happened. He noticed reviews from blogs were ranking higher than even those by mainstream media.

That’s an anecdote I recall from Webster in a recent podcast with Mark Schaefer called Influence Marketing is hot and about to get hotter. How it is that content, from the lowly blogger, could possibly outrank an article – written by a bona fide reporter and published by an authoritative domain of traditional news site – in search? Read More…

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Social Media Gurus and the Foolhardy Trend to Bash SEO



by Frank Strong

Bash SEO

Some time ago, I chatted up an alleged communications and social media proponent on Twitter, in an effort to, well, start a “relationship.” This person remarked despite the growth of the network, they just couldn’t “get into Google+” – to which I responded, well, it’s important for search.

In the context at that moment, the response came back rather sharp in tone.  This person didn’t use social media for SEO, they used it for relationships. The irony of that statement notwithstanding, the response was seeping with an implication and indictment that was far broader than just Google+:  SEO is a dirty term; only gamers think about SEO.

What bothered me the most about that “conversation” was it underscored a lack of understanding of just how important search is to anyone interested in relationship building. If we, or our content, cannot be found then just who are we building relationships with? Read More…

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The Complicated Problem of Social CRM



by Frank Strong

complaint department

Social CRM in some businesses are handled by the complaint department (Photo credit: Flickr)

The morning Twitter launched its IPO, I whipped out my iPhone to place a trade using the USAA app and to my dismay could not get it to work.

I’m not sure what happened, but I did what many customers on a mobile device do:  I tweeted @USAA for help.  And like many companies that freeze up with social media fear, or simply haven’t properly staffed social media, USAA responded some 12 hours later from a different Twitter handle: @USAA_help.

Fortunately, in the time in-between, I used the phone’s voice activated service to call the brokerage and placed a trade.  Social media notwithstanding, USAA is typically known for great customer service, and the bank placed the trade at the online commission price of $8.95 where a phone trade typically comes with a higher commission. A short while later I was the proud owner of 10 shares in TWTR at the market price of $45.10. Read More…

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