Sword and the Script

8 Epic Takeaways from Joe Pulizzi’s Epic Content Marketing



by Frank Strong

8 Epic Takeaways from Joe Pulizzi Epic Content Marketing

There are a lot of business books that claim to have something for everyone – from beginner to expert.  Epic Content Marketing, by Joe Pulizzi, is one of the few that fulfills that promise.

Recently I finished his book, and as it is with many books I consume these days, I listened to the audio version – all 8.5 hours of it – over the course of several long drives. It was well worth the time invested and I’d recommend it to anyone in marketing, if you consume one book by year’s end, make Epic Content Marketing that book.

Pulizzi says he first started using the phrase “content marketing” in 2001 when working for a custom publisher.  Few marketing executives had an interest in “custom publishing” but the term content marketing seemed to resonate. Read More…

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3 Takeaways from Neal Schaffer’s Maximize Your Social



by Frank Strong

Neal Schaffer Maximize Your Social

Ever get two birds with one stone?  I did this past Monday.

Zen Yinger sent me a note on Twitter telling me Neal Schaffer was in town for a book signing at a local Barnes & Noble.  I “met” them both somewhere along the social media trail about two or three years ago – and this week I was lucky to meet them both in person.

“Social media complements everything and replaces nothing,” Neal said as he kicked off his book signing talk (video posted nearby). What’s interesting about Neal is that he comes at things from a sales and business development perspective, rather than a marketing and PR perspective. I often find his views refreshing – and outside the doldrums of the echo chamber. Read More…

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Book Review: 7 Takeaways from Jay Baer’s YOUtility



by Frank Strong

YOUtility-Jay-Baer

One audiobook that deserves a spot on your summer reading list.

Every now and again a book comes along with the potential to change minds.  Though I pour through dozens of books every year — often “cheating” by listening to audiobooks on long drives, those that really capture my mind are far and few between.  The audiobook YOUtiliy by Jay Baer however, is certainly time well spent.

He breaks down the concepts of content marketing with a simple elegance that crystallizes why this is so important.  It’s a style he’s perfected on his blog, Convince and Convert, and it came through in this work.  His mantra of “hype free” will not disappoint.

Whether you are a novice or an expert that already knows everything, I can promise that YOUtility will give you something to think about.  And here are my 7 take-aways. Read More…

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Nine Takeaways from Lee Odden’s Optimize



by Frank Strong

Lee Odden‘s new book Optimize as about 10 years of blogging — and all the lessons and experience that go into that endeavor – stuffed into 232 pages.

If you follow the Online Marketing Blog many of the themes Lee and his team write about there are distilled, refined and presented an easy to read book.

“Lee tackles the triple crown of online marketing – SEO, social media, and content marketing,” wrote Geoff Livingston in a review on Amazon.com. “As social networks became entrenched in the online space, search increasingly used social verification to qualify online content…The result is a seamless intertwining of the three disciplines. None of them alone are strong enough to succeed, but together organizations can deploy knock out strategies.”

There’s one other major theme in Lee’s book:  PR.  Lee’s done a lot to get the basics of SEO across to PR pros because whether they know it or not, PR pros are perhaps one of the best means for authoritative link-building. And link’s are arguable still the top determining factor in search rankings, which in turn, is still a primary means for people to find content.   Read More…

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Unintended consequences: don’t blink, it’s buyology



Ever see cigarette warning labels in Europe?  They’re pretty gross (pictured nearby).  Think they work?  Surveys of smokers say yes, but interviews with their brains say no.   In fact, researchers have found that warning labels actually trigger smoking stimulus. Talk about unintended consequences.

So says Martin Lindstrom in a new book called Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy.  Market researchers scanned the brains (think MRI) of smokers and found that warning labels seemed to indicate an inclination, rather than aversion, to smoking during viewing.  This despite indicating on a survey that those same smokers felt warning labels had the same effect. What does that mean for your market research survey?

What’s more fascinating is that Lindstrom suggests the survey takers weren’t lying, but rather the marketing messages we see every day influence our brains subliminally and often in ways our conscious cognitive reasoning would otherwise reject.  Meet neuromarketing.   Read More…

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